Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Thrombocytopenia


Treatment

Mild to moderate thrombocytopenia may not require treatment. General caution, however, dictates that in individuals with thrombocytopenia invasive procedures or injury be avoided and, if possible, any drug that may affect platelets, such as aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) be also avoided. Treatment may be needed only when the individual has had a traumatic injury or is preparing for surgery.

In more significant thrombocytopenia, treatment addresses the underlying cause of the thrombocytopenia. For possible drug-induced thrombocytopenia, all drugs that could reduce the numbers of platelets must be discontinued. Only medically necessary drugs should be continued. In individuals with ITP, if the condition is life-threatening, intravenous immune globulin should be given. If infection is present, treatment must be directed primarily at clearing the infection. Malignancy-caused thrombocytopenia is treated with appropriate chemotherapy for the causal neoplasm. Removal of the spleen (splenectomy) may be beneficial if the spleen is sequestering platelets.

Immune thrombocytopenia is initially treated with immunosuppressant glucocorticoid drugs until platelet counts return to normal. At that time the glucocorticoids should be tapered off. Individuals with chronic thrombocytopenia may need additional treatment cycles to maintain an adequate platelet count. Individuals with severe bleeding are hospitalized and treated with intravenous glucocorticoids plus high-dose immune globulin (immune globulin increases platelet survival time). If the bleeding is life-threatening, platelet transfusions may also be given. Splenectomy is beneficial for individuals who do not respond to steroid therapy or require unacceptably high doses to maintain adequate platelets. Although in immune thrombocytopenia the spleen does not sequester platelets, it does produce the antibodies that attack the platelets. Removing the spleen removes the source of the destructive antibodies.

Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, severe thrombocytopenia in pregnancy, and post-transfusion thrombocytopenia are treated with plasma exchange (plasmapheresis). Immune globulin is also given when needed.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor