Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Thrombophlebitis


Related Terms

  • Deep Venous Thrombosis
  • DVT
  • Phlebitis
  • Superficial Thrombophlebitis
  • Superficial Vein Thrombosis
  • Venous Thrombosis

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Hematologist
  • Internal Medicine Physician
  • Vascular Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The specific site, cause, and extent of the blockage, the treatment necessary to relieve the condition, individual response to treatment, concurrent medical conditions, age and general health of the individual, the ability to ambulate, and the development of complications, may influence the duration of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
451.0 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis of Superficial Veins of Lower Extremities
451.11 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Femoral Vein (Deep) (Superficial)
451.19 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Other; Femoropopliteal Vein; Popliteal Vein; Tibial Vein
451.2 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Of Lower Extremities, Unspecified
451.81 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Iliac Vein
451.82 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis of Superficial Veins of Upper Extremities
451.83 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis of Deep Vessels of the Upper Extremities
451.84 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis of Upper Extremities, Unspecified
451.89 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Other Site
451.9 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, of Unspecified Site
670.34 - Puerperal septic thrombophlebitis, postpartum condition or complication

Overview

Thrombophlebitis is an inflammation of a vein (phlebitis) accompanied by an increased tendency to form blood clots (hypercoagulability), which leads to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the vein. It can develop spontaneously or can be a complication of an injury, a disease, or a medical or surgical treatment.

Thrombophlebitis can be separated into two main categories depending on the depth of the inflamed veins containing the blood clots: those that occur in veins just below the surface of the skin (superficial thrombophlebitis) and those that occur in a deep vein that usually accompanies an artery (deep venous thrombosis [DVT]). Although both conditions stem from the same causes and involve a similar physiologic process, superficial thrombophlebitis usually is not life threatening, while DVT is associated with high morbidity and mortality. (Please refer to Deep Vein Thrombosis for more specific information). Migratory thrombophlebitis that passes from one leg to the other is associated with pancreatic or lung cancer, and the diagnostic process must focus on finding a possible malignancy. Septic thrombophlebitis is another serious form of the condition accompanied by infection and life-threatening coagulation abnormalities.

Thrombus formation is part of the normal coagulation of blood that helps prevent bleeding when blood vessels are penetrated or injured. However, if blood does not move through a vessel as quickly as it should (venous stasis, venostasis) or a vessel is injured in some way, an inflammatory response begins in the blood vessel, and thrombus (clot) formation may follow. In superficial thrombophlebitis, the inflammatory response is followed immediately by platelet aggregation at the site of the injury, the first step in clot formation. A common example is clot formation at the insertion site of an intravenous (IV) line or as a result of trauma to the vein. Platelet aggregation in this type of thrombophlebitis usually can be decreased with anti-inflammatory medications. The treatment goal is to prevent superficial phlebitis from progressing, and thus affecting deeper veins and causing damage that can lead to chronic blood flow problems in the deep veins (deep vein insufficiency, sometimes referred to as postphlebitic syndrome).

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) develops as a result of three conditions referred to as the Virchow triad: venous stasis, injury to the vein, and a state of hypercoagulability. A thrombus is most likely to form in the larger veins in the lower extremities (lower leg and thigh). This thrombus may interfere with circulation in the legs, and the clot may break off and travel through the bloodstream (embolize). The migrating thrombus (embolus) can pass through the bloodstream to the heart, and then lodge in an artery of the lungs (pulmonary embolism), reducing the flow of blood and oxygen availability and causing shortness of breath and chest pain. Pulmonary embolism is the most frequent and serious complication of DVT. In individuals with an atrial septal defect (patent foramen ovale) or a ventricular septal defect, an embolus of venous origin can pass through the septal defect from the right side to the left side of the heart, and cause a brain embolism (stroke) called a paradoxical embolism. DVT requires prompt treatment with anticoagulant medications and sometimes requires surgery.

Incidence and Prevalence: The statistics on thrombophlebitis are illusive. Few studies examine the incidence and prevalence of thrombophlebitis and many that do are outdated. Surveillance of thrombophlebitis is difficult as many cases go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Approximately 65% of the reported cases occur in women with an average age of 60 years (Decousus; Canero-Vidal). The incidence of superficial thrombophlebitis is likely higher than DVT, which has an estimated incidence of at least 56-160 cases per 100,000 per year or 3-11% of the population (Decousus; Canero-Vidal). This is about double the incidence of DVT and pulmonary embolism combined. DVT and related pulmonary embolism are the leading preventable cause of death in hospitalized individuals.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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