Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Thrombophlebitis


Related Terms

  • Deep Venous Thrombosis
  • DVT
  • Phlebitis
  • Superficial Thrombophlebitis
  • Superficial Vein Thrombosis
  • Venous Thrombosis

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Hematologist
  • Internal Medicine Physician
  • Vascular Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The specific site, cause, and extent of the blockage, the treatment necessary to relieve the condition, individual response to treatment, concurrent medical conditions, age and general health of the individual, the ability to ambulate, and the development of complications, may influence the duration of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
451.0 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis of Superficial Veins of Lower Extremities
451.11 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Femoral Vein (Deep) (Superficial)
451.19 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Other; Femoropopliteal Vein; Popliteal Vein; Tibial Vein
451.2 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Of Lower Extremities, Unspecified
451.81 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Iliac Vein
451.82 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis of Superficial Veins of Upper Extremities
451.83 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis of Deep Vessels of the Upper Extremities
451.84 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis of Upper Extremities, Unspecified
451.89 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, Other Site
451.9 - Phlebitis and Thrombophlebitis, of Unspecified Site
670.34 - Puerperal septic thrombophlebitis, postpartum condition or complication

Treatment

The goals of treatment for superficial thrombophlebitis are to increase comfort and to prevent progression to DVT. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) usually will reverse the inflammation characteristic of superficial thrombophlebitis and help relieve pain. Anticoagulants (e.g., warfarin) may be used to prevent new clot formation. Thrombolytic therapy is used infrequently to dissolve an existing clot. Antibiotics may be used if an infection is present.

Compression stockings (thrombo-embolism deterrent [TED] hose) are routinely recommended and are able to reduce the incidence of recurrent DVT (Kearon).
Compression also may be useful in helping to reduce pain in some cases. Moist heat may also be applied to decrease inflammation and pain of superficial thrombophlebitis. The affected limb may be elevated to reduce edema and pain by reducing pressure on the inflamed vein, and to decrease the risk of further damage. However, some physicians and recent research studies suggest that elevation of the leg and the immobility of bed rest promote venostasis, an important risk factor for DVT, and therefore continued ambulation may be recommended to limit venostasis and clot formation. Air travel, long car rides, and bed rest are not recommended for people with any type of phlebitis or increased blood clotting tendency.

Surgical intervention including clot removal (thrombectomy), vein stripping, or vein bypass is rarely needed in superficial thrombophlebitis but may be considered if anticoagulant therapy is ineffective. A symptomatic, painful superficial vein may instead be punctured and a clot removed (puncture and evacuation) under local anesthesia, providing rapid relief.

DVT requires anticoagulant therapy as soon as possible after diagnosis is confirmed. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMW heparin) is used immediately to prevent thrombus extension, and often can decrease the risk of thrombus formation and embolus migration. It does not dissolve the existing clot, but prevents extension (growth) of the clot, and prevents recurrence of thrombosis. It is often given simultaneously with the initiation of warfarin therapy to reverse the hypercoagulability until warfarin has had the time necessary to control the hypercoagulability. Individuals with recurrent venous thrombosis or risk factors that are not correctable (e.g., prior DVT, clotting factor mutations, or advanced stage cancer) may be candidates for longer-term anticoagulation.

Thrombolytic therapy may be given in those with DVT to dissolve the original clot and prevent pulmonary embolism. It does not prevent new clot formation and must be followed by oral anticoagulation therapy. A "bird cage" filter may be placed in the major vein in the abdomen (inferior vena cava) that carries blood from the lower body to the heart to prevent pulmonary embolism in an individual with DVT. The procedure involves giving local anesthesia, insertion of the cage-like filter (e.g., Greenfield filter) through the femoral artery in the groin, and threading it into place in the vena cava using fluoroscopy or ultrasound images to guide the placement. Thrombectomy is more often performed for DVT when anticoagulant therapy is ineffective or contraindicated.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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