Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Tinea


Related Terms

  • Athlete's Foot
  • Dermatomycosis
  • Dermatophytosis
  • Epidermophytosis
  • Jock Itch
  • Microsporosis
  • Pityriasis Versicolor
  • Ringworm
  • Trichophytosis

Specialists

  • Dermatologist
  • Family Physician
  • Infectious Disease Internist
  • Internal Medicine Physician

Comorbid Conditions

  • Compromised immune system
  • Diabetes

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability is influenced by the severity and length of time the infection is present. If the infection occurs on the feet or hands or if skin erosion has occurred, disability may extend until the skin heals, sometimes several weeks. Individuals with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders may have increased duration of infection.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
110.0 - Dermatophytosis, Scalp and Beard; Kerion; Sycosis, Mycotic; Trichophytic Tinea, Scalp
110.1 - Dermatophytosis, Nail; Dermatophytic Onychia; Onychomycosis; Tinea Unguium
110.2 - Dermatophytosis, Hand; Tinea Manuum
110.3 - Dermatophytosis, Groin and Perianal Area; Dhobie Itch; Eczema Marginatum; Tinea Cruris
110.4 - Dermatophytosis, Foot; Athletes Foot; Tinea Pedis
110.5 - Dermatophytosis, Body; Herpes Circinatus; Tinea Imbricata
110.6 - Dermatophytosis, Deep Seated; Granuloma Trichophyticum; Majocchis Granuloma
110.8 - Dermatophytosis, Specified Sites
110.9 - Dermatophytosis, Unspecified Site; Favus NOS; Microsporic Tinea NOS; Ringworm NOS
111.8 - Dermatomycosis, Other Specified
111.9 - Dermatomycosis, Unspecified

Diagnosis

History: The individual has a history of a red, slightly raised, scaly, rash with an elevated border that is circular in some cases. The most common location is between the toes, especially for males (athlete's foot). Rash may also be reported in the beard area; the groin, excluding the scrotum or penis (jock itch); under the fingernails or toenails; and on the trunk and shoulders. The rash can be extremely itchy. Individuals with tinea capitis report hair loss.

Physical exam: The exam reveals the scaly characteristic rash on one or more parts of the body including the scalp, groin, nails, feet, hands, general body skin, and the skin under the beard. As the fungus grows outward, the central area heals and can leave a red ring where the infection is active. Tinea versicolor appears scaly and bumpy and can make dark skin appear lighter or light skin appear brownish in color.

On the skin, the patches grow to about one inch in diameter. Under a beard, an itchy scaly rash may develop. Infections of the groin often show concentric rings. On the feet, dry scaling is apparent. Cracking of the skin between the toes and on the arch of the foot may develop. Nails of the toes or fingers may become red, swollen, and painful. A nonspecific dermatitis may develop at other sites on the hands or feet. Tinea versicolor appears in scaly brownish or white patches. Uncommonly, tinea skin rashes may blister, break open, ooze, and become crusty.

Tests: Diagnosis is primarily based on the appearance of the skin. Identification of the yeast in microscopic examination of skin scrapings using potassium hydroxide (KOH) confirms the diagnosis. Tinea capitis is sometimes diagnosed using ultraviolet (UV) light; the infected hairs fluoresce when exposed to UV wavelengths.

Fungal cultures are not routinely performed unless the diagnosis remains in question or the species identification of yeast is needed in order to choose a treatment medication.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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