Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Toxic Effects, Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticides


Related Terms

  • Carbaryl Exposure
  • Dichlorvos Exposure
  • Malathion Exposure
  • Parathion Exposure
  • Phorate Exposure
  • Phosdrin Exposure

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Medical Toxicologist
  • Pharmacologist
  • Preventive Medicine Specialist

Factors Influencing Duration

Absorbed dose is the primary determinant of the severity of toxic effects and therefore the severity and duration of disability. Absorbed dose depends on environmental levels, routes of exposure (skin contact, inhalation, ingestion), and duration of exposure.
The period of observation can vary from several hours for the asymptomatic individual to at least 48 hours of hospitalization in symptomatic cases. Recovery periods can vary from a few days to almost a year.
Other factors influencing disability include pre-existing disease, age, pregnancy, and allergy, all of which affect individual susceptibility to the toxic effect of chemical exposures and the individual's ability to recover functional capacity and return to work. Psychological and emotional factors may also play a role in the extent and duration of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
989.3 - Toxic Effects, Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticides

Diagnosis

History: Individuals may complain of mild flu-like symptoms, including headache, muscle cramps, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. They often report exposure to pesticides in agricultural or manufacturing environments. Because of the nonspecific nature of symptoms in mild poisonings, the history of exposure is an important diagnostic tool.

In general, the onset of symptoms is more rapid after respiratory exposure than ingestion or skin absorption, ranging from minutes to hours. However, significant variation in onset of symptoms occurs, depending on the specific agent and its metabolism, as well as individual variation in response. Delayed onset of 24 to 48 hours can occur.

Physical exam: Individuals with mild poisoning present with weakness, headache, and gastrointestinal upsets. With more severe poisoning, characteristic findings include small pupils (miosis), excessive salivation, respiratory distress, hyperactive bowel sounds, hypertension, generalized muscle weakness, tremor, convulsions, altered consciousness, and coma.

Two syndromes are recognized. In the immediate syndrome, symptoms appear relatively soon after exposure. In organophosphate-induced delayed syndrome, symptoms appear at least 10 days after a single acute exposure or after months of cumulative small exposures (Dyro).

Tests: Specific laboratory diagnosis of organophosphate/carbamate poisoning is possible. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity can be measured in the serum and red blood cells (RBC). The red cell measurement is more specific, as the serum level may be decreased with liver disease or chronic inflammation from any cause. Clinical symptoms generally appear after the RBC activity has been depressed by 50% of baseline, but the rate of decline is more important than the absolute level. Some individuals may have mild symptoms when the AChE activity is depressed by 30% to 50%. AChE levels are not particularly useful in following recovery after acute poisoning (clinical observation is the best guide), but they are essential in the biologic monitoring of occupationally exposed workers.

Supportive laboratory tests include CBC, arterial blood gas (ABG), serum electrolytes, BUN, creatine, and serum glucose. A chest x-ray may be useful in determining the presence of pulmonary edema, and an electrocardiogram (ECG) in identifying heart dysrhythmias.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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