Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Toxic Effects, Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticides


Related Terms

  • Carbaryl Exposure
  • Dichlorvos Exposure
  • Malathion Exposure
  • Parathion Exposure
  • Phorate Exposure
  • Phosdrin Exposure

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Medical Toxicologist
  • Pharmacologist
  • Preventive Medicine Specialist

Factors Influencing Duration

Absorbed dose is the primary determinant of the severity of toxic effects and therefore the severity and duration of disability. Absorbed dose depends on environmental levels, routes of exposure (skin contact, inhalation, ingestion), and duration of exposure.
The period of observation can vary from several hours for the asymptomatic individual to at least 48 hours of hospitalization in symptomatic cases. Recovery periods can vary from a few days to almost a year.
Other factors influencing disability include pre-existing disease, age, pregnancy, and allergy, all of which affect individual susceptibility to the toxic effect of chemical exposures and the individual's ability to recover functional capacity and return to work. Psychological and emotional factors may also play a role in the extent and duration of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
989.3 - Toxic Effects, Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticides

Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) recommended airborne permissible exposure limits (PEL) range from less than 0.1 to 15 mg/cubic meter, and recommended exposure limits for skin as a time-weighted average (TWA) range from less than 0.1 to 15 mg/cubic meter over an 8-hour work shift.

The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health's (NIOSH) recommended airborne exposure limits (REL) range from less than 1.0 to 15 mg/cubic meter, and skin exposure limits as a time-weighted average (TWA) range from less than 0.05 to 10 mg/cubic meter over an 10-hour work shift. OSHA and NIOSH exposure limits for each specific chemical are available in print or on line.

The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) recommended airborne exposure values range from 0.9 to 10 mg/cubic meter for an 8-hour work shift.

Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) values range from 10 to 250 mg/cubic meter.

Where organophosphates and carbamates are manufactured, stored, formulated, or transported, workers should wear protective work clothing and wash thoroughly immediately after exposure and at the end of each work shift. Hazard and warning information should be posted in the work area. In addition, as part of an ongoing education and training effort, all information on the health and safety hazards of the organophosphates and carbamates should be communicated to potentially exposed workers.

Skin contact with organophosphates and carbamates should be avoided. Protective gloves and clothing should be worn. Safety equipment suppliers and manufacturers can provide recommendations on the most protective glove/clothing material for the particular operation.

All protective clothing (suits, gloves, footwear, and headgear) should be clean, available each day, and put on before work.

Eye protection should include at least goggles and face shields when needed. Eye protection is provided where a supplied air respirator is used. Where the potential exists for exposures over the listed values, a OSHA/NIOSH-approved supplied-air respirator with a full face piece operated in the positive pressure mode or with a full face piece and hood should be used. A helmet in the continuous flow mode or the use of a OSHA/NIOSH-approved self-contained breathing apparatus with a full face piece operated in pressure-demand or other positive pressure mode may be needed.

Workers who apply pesticides for pest control should wear the protective clothing while engaged in their work. The fabric will vary, depending upon the toxicity and form of the pesticide. Shirts, trousers, hats, and chemical-resistant footwear, as well as chemical-resistant gloves, are the minimum. If highly toxic materials are being applied, breathing apparatus and full-body chemically resistant clothing, gloves, and boots may be needed.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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