Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Traction


Specialists

  • Neurologist
  • Neurosurgeon
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Rheumatologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Circulatory disorders (e.g., varicose veins)
  • Osteomyelitis
  • Skin conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The length of disability depends on whether the traction is an intermittent therapy used at home or in a physical therapy office or if it is part of long-term treatment in a hospital setting.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
93.41 - Spinal Traction Using Skull Device; Traction Using: Caliper Tongs, Crutchfield Tongs, Halo Device, Vinke Tongs
93.42 - Spinal Traction, Other
93.43 - Skeletal Traction, Intermittent
93.44 - Skeletal Traction, Other; Bryants Traction; Dunlops Traction; Lyman Smith Traction; Russells Traction
93.45 - Thomas Splint Traction
93.46 - Skin Traction of Limbs, Other; Adhesive Tape Traction; Boot Traction; Bucks Traction; Gallows Traction

How Procedure is Performed

Skin traction uses noninvasive means in attaching weights to the skin to apply a pulling force to the underlying bone. Depending on where traction is needed, weights are attached with tape, straps, boots, or cuffs. Skin traction on the fingers may use the weight of the arm hanging by the fingers as the traction force without any added weights. Traction is applied to the trunk with a waist belt attached to ropes and pulleys and is actually a form of skin traction.

Skeletal traction requires insertion of pins or wires into the bone either during open surgery or pierced through the skin. The pins are then rigged to weights by ropes and pulleys. Traction to the head applies a pulling force to the neck and can be accomplished with a neck halter hooked to a rope and pulley system or by tongs inserted directly into the skull that are then hooked onto a rope and pulley system.

Inversion traction (a form of skeletal traction) places the individual in a partially upside down position. Fixation devices apply a gentle, steady force to encourage bone lengthening in a procedure called an Ilizarov limb lengthening. The Ilizarov technique involves the application of skeletal traction to two different sites in the same bone. The bone is then cut in the middle and gradually separated (distracted) through an attached external frame. This technique is usually used to lengthen long bones. These devices can also be used to maintain fracture alignment while allowing joint motion.

Traction equipment needs to hang from a bed frame or over a doorframe usually by means of a pulley. It can be used temporarily (e.g., during surgery to maintain body position) or applied for weeks at a time as in a neck fracture. Short periods of manual traction are used during reduction of fractures and dislocations where the physician or assistant manually applies the traction force against the weight of the individual.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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