Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Transurethral Incision of Bladder Neck


Related Terms

  • Transurethral Incision of the Prostate (TUIP)

Specialists

  • Urologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The presence of complications may influence the length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
57.91 - Sphincterotomy of Bladder; Division of Bladder Neck

Overview

© Reed Group
Transurethral incision of the bladder neck is an operative procedure that involves cutting the muscles of the bladder neck. It is accompanied by a procedure to examine the bladder (cystoscopy procedure). The bladder neck is the lower part of the bladder that connects to the urethra. The muscles may be cut at one or several locations.

Conditions for which the procedure may be recommended include obstruction of the bladder neck due to benign enlargement of the prostate gland (prostatic hyperplasia) or scarring (contracture) that can occur after resection of the prostate. It can also be performed to treat a condition in which there is dysfunction of the bladder neck leading to obstruction (dyssynergia).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Reason for Procedure

This procedure may be used to treat urinary outflow obstruction caused by abnormalities of the bladder neck. In men, the outflow of urine through the bladder neck can become obstructed as a result of benign prostatic hyperplasia, dysfunction of the muscles of the bladder neck (dyssynergia), and a type of scarring (contracture) of the bladder neck that occurs after resection of prostatic tissue. Contracture is due to growth of fibrous connective tissue, which replaces normal muscle tissue of the bladder neck. It results in loss of the normal mobility of the bladder neck. Although obstruction of the bladder neck is less common in women, it may be caused by tumors of the uterus or urethra.

This procedure can be performed as an alternative method for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia. It is normally only performed if the prostate is small.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



How Procedure is Performed

Spinal anesthesia is usually used, although general anesthesia may also be used. The individual lies on the operating room table on his or her back with legs up in stirrups (lithotomy position). The opening of the urethra (meatus) is cleansed with a surgical scrub solution, and surgical drapes are placed. A type of cystoscope (resectoscope) is inserted into the urethra. An irrigation system is attached and is inserted until the bladder neck can be visualized. An instrument called the Colling's knife is passed through the scope to the bladder. The surgeon makes small incisions into the wall of the bladder neck at the 5 o'clock and/or 7 o'clock positions. There may be some bleeding for 24 hours after the surgery, and a urine drainage tube (Foley catheter) may be left in the bladder for 24 hours until the urine is clear.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

The predicted successful outcome of transurethral incision of the bladder neck is relief of urinary symptoms due to obstruction of the bladder neck in about 80% of individuals. The outcome of treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia is usually good.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

Complications may include bleeding, infection, perforation of the bladder, incontinence, erectile dysfunction, and stricture. The reported incidence of ejaculation of semen into the urinary bladder (retrograde ejaculation) ranges from 6% to 55% (Thompson).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

No work restrictions or accommodations are necessary as a result of this procedure.

Risk: Once recovery is complete and the individual has returned to his or her job duties, there is no risk to working following transurethral incision of the bladder neck.

Capacity: Capacity is unaffected following this procedure.

Tolerance: Tolerance is typically not a concern following this procedure. Reassurance for bathroom access may be needed.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Maximum Medical Improvement

30 days.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

Cited

Thompson, E. G. , and J. C. Nickel. "Transurethral Incision of the Prostate (TUIP) for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia." WebMD.com. 5 Mar. 2012. WebMD, LLC. 21 Jul. 2015 <http://www.webmd.com/men/prostate-enlargement-bph/transurethral-incision-of-the-prostate-tuip-for-benign-prostatic-hyperplasia>.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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