Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Tubal Ligation


Related Terms

  • Bilateral Endoscopic Destruction of the Fallopian Tubes
  • Female Sterilization Surgery
  • Female Surgical Sterilization
  • Tied Tubes
  • Tubal Occlusion
  • Tubal Sterilization

Specialists

  • General Surgeon
  • Gynecologist
  • Obstetrician/Gynecologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Allergy to pain medication or anesthesia drugs
  • Heart conditions
  • Lung conditions
  • Obesity
  • Previous lower abdominal surgery

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability may be influenced by whether the tubal ligation was done following birth, the method used (laparoscopy, minilaparotomy, or laparotomy), and any complications.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
66.2 - Tubal Ligation; Bilateral Endoscopic Destruction or Occlusion of Fallopian Tubes
66.21 - Bilateral Endoscopic Ligation and Crushing of Fallopian Tubes
66.22 - Bilateral Endoscopic Ligation and Division of Fallopian Tubes
66.29 - Other Bilateral Endoscopic Destruction or Occlusion of Fallopian Tubes
V25.2 - Encounter for Contraceptive Management, Tubal Ligation

Overview

© Reed Group
Tubal ligation is a surgical procedure that closes (ligates) the fallopian tubes to prevent an unfertilized egg from reaching the uterus. Two fallopian tubes connect the ovaries to the uterus and conduct the egg to the uterus. After tubal ligation, when sperm enter the uterus through sexual intercourse, no eggs are present for fertilization. However, the ovaries continue to function normally, and the released eggs are harmlessly absorbed by the body.

Many women use tubal ligation as a permanent method of contraception. It is more than 99% effective (Gabbe 615). If the woman later desires pregnancy, the tubal ligation can be successfully reversed in 50% to 80% of cases (Stenchever 345).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Reason for Procedure

Tubal ligation is performed as a method of contraception because it is very effective and, in particular, gives an option to women who are unable to use other methods of contraception. This procedure also may be performed in cases in which the woman has a health problem that makes pregnancy unsafe, or if she has a genetic disorder that makes pregnancy inadvisable.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



How Procedure is Performed

The tubal sterilization procedure is performed in a hospital or outpatient clinic under local or general anesthesia. Laparoscopy is the most common method. It begins with a tiny incision in the abdomen near the navel. The surgeon inserts a narrow telescope-like instrument called a laparoscope through the incision. A second small incision is made just above the pubic hairline, and a probe is inserted. Once the tubes are found, the surgeon closes them using such techniques as applying rings, clips, or using electric current to cauterize and destroy a portion of the tube (electrocoagulation).

Another method, the mini-laparotomy, requires an incision about 2 inches long in the lower abdomen. It does not employ a viewing instrument. Working through the incision, the surgeon ties and cuts the tubes.

A third, less common, more invasive method called laparotomy requires a 2- to 5-inch incision in the lower abdomen. Two other procedures called magnified visual inspection (culdoscopy) and surgical incision in the vagina (colpotomy) allow access to the tubes through the vagina rather than through the abdomen. Neither of these procedures is used often. The most appropriate method for an individual woman depends on the woman's age, weight, any previous lower abdominal surgeries, heart and lung conditions, and other considerations.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

Predicted outcome after tubal ligation is good. Most individuals recover with no problems associated with the anesthesia or the surgery. The rate of pregnancy after the procedure is 1.85% (Stenchever 449).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

Complications related to anesthesia include reaction to anesthesia drugs and breathing problems. Complications related to the surgery include bleeding and infection. On rare occasions, the bowels or vessels are injured and may require major surgical repair. An additional complication, possible fertility that could result in pregnancy, may result from incomplete closure of the tubes. Although the rate of pregnancy after tubal ligation is 1.85%, about 32.9% of the pregnancies that do occur are ectopic (occurring in a fallopian tube rather than in the uterus) (Stenchever 449).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Most individuals who undergo laparoscopic tubal ligation can return to work within a few days, with the provision that they not engage in heavy lifting or other strenuous work duties for up to 2 weeks. Individuals who receive a laparotomy require more sick leave and a longer restriction on strenuous work duties.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

Cited

Gabbe, Steven G., et al., eds. Obstetrics - Normal and Problem Pregnancies. 4th ed. New York: Churchill Livingstone, Inc., 2002.

Pollack, A. "Clinical Management Guidelines for Obstetrician-Gynecologists." Obstetrics and Gynecology 102 3 (2003): 647-658.

Stenchever, Morton. Comprehensive Gynecology. 4th ed. St. Louis: Mosby, Inc., 2001.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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