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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Upper Respiratory Infection


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Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
465.0 - Acute Laryngopharyngitis
465.8 - Upper Respiratory Infection, Acute, of Multiple or Unspecified Sites; Other Multiple Sites; Multiple URI
465.9 - Upper Respiratory Infection, Acute, of Multiple or Unspecified Sites; Unspecified Site

Related Terms

  • Acute Coryza
  • Cold
  • Common Cold
  • Rhinitis
  • Upper Respiratory Bacterial Infection
  • Upper Respiratory Tract Infection
  • URI
  • URTI
  • Viral Pharyngitis

Overview

An upper respiratory infection (URI) is a viral or bacterial infection that affects the nose, throat (pharynx), sinuses, and voice box (larynx). These are the most common of all illnesses. The most familiar upper respiratory infections include the common cold (rhinopharyngitis), infection of the throat (pharyngitis), tonsils (tonsillitis), the maxillary sinuses behind the nose (sinusitis), and the larynx (laryngitis). Ear infections (acute otitis media) are another manifestation of URI. More serious upper respiratory infections include epiglottitis, an inflammation of the upper portion of the larynx and supraglottic area.

Colds and influenza can affect the air passages in the head, neck, and chest (bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli). For more information, see Cold, Pharyngitis, Acute Sinusitis, or Influenza.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

Meneghetti, Anne. "Upper Respiratory Tract Infection." eMedicine. Eds. Gregory William Rutecki, et al. 12 Aug. 2009. Medscape. 1 Sep. 2009 <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/302460-overview>.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor