Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Vesicourethropexy


Related Terms

  • Anterior Colporrhaphy
  • Burch Procedure
  • Cooper Ligament Colposuspension
  • Cystourethropexy
  • Endoscopic Suspension of the Vesical Neck
  • Fascial Sling Procedure
  • Lateral Paravaginal Repair
  • Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz Procedure
  • Modified Pereyra Procedure
  • Stamey Technique

Specialists

  • Gynecologist
  • Urologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The method used, any complications, and the individual's response to treatment may affect the length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
59.4 - Suprapubic Sling Operation; Goebel-Frangenheim-Stoeckel Urethrovesical Suspension; Millin-Read Urethrovesical Suspension; Oxford Operation for Urinary Incontinence; Urethrocystopexy by Suprapubic Suspension
59.5 - Retropubic Urethral Suspension; Burch Procedure; Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz Operation; Suture of Periurethral Tissue to Symphysis Pubis; Urethra Suspension NOS
59.6 - Paraurethral Suspension; Pereyra Paraurethral Suspension; Periurethral Suspension
59.71 - Levator Muscle Operation for Urethrovesical Suspension; Cystourethropexy with Levator Muscle Sling; Gracilis Muscle Transplant for Urethrovesical Suspension; Pubococcygeal

Overview

Vesicourethropexy is a term used to describe a wide variety of surgical procedures performed to relieve stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The procedures all ultimately result in repositioning of the urethra and bladder neck. Vesicourethropexy is usually considered only after more conservative forms of treatment have failed.

Stress incontinence is a type of urinary incontinence that occurs when the pressure inside the bladder that is produced by the contracting bladder muscles (detrusor muscles), along with the pressure in the abdomen (intra-abdominal pressure), exceeds the pressure of the closed urethra. Leakage of urine can obviously occur if the intra-abdominal pressure increases during exertion, such as when running or jumping or when the individual coughs, laughs, or sneezes.

In women, stress incontinence is believed to be the result of reduced pelvic-floor muscle tone secondary to childbirth and aging, and is most common in women who are not yet menopausal. Over time, weakness of the pelvic supporting tissue resulting in descent and/or rotation of the bladder neck can cause urinary leakage. The relaxed pelvic floor muscles will alter the angle of the urethra and bladder neck (urethrovesical angle), inviting correction by urethropexy or vesicourethropexy. In postmenopausal women, reduced estrogen levels may be a cause of incontinence. However, in both middle-aged and older women, the apparent cause of the incontinence is reduced muscle tone of the internal and external urinary sphincter.

Stress incontinence also occurs in men, most often in conjunction with prostatitis or following prostate surgery; males are usually treated medically.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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