Sign-in
(your email):
(case sensitive):



 
 

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Vestibular Neuronitis


Text Only Home | Graphic-Rich Site | Overview | Risk and Causation | Diagnosis | Treatment | Prognosis | Differential Diagnosis | Specialists | Rehabilitation | Comorbid Conditions | Complications | Factors Influencing Duration | Length of Disability | Ability to Work | Failure to Recover | Medical Codes | References

Overview

Vestibular neuronitis is an acute inflammation or dysfunction of the vestibular portion (vestibular labyrinth) of the inner ear, characterized by a disturbance in balance, sensation of movement (vertigo), nausea, and/or vomiting. The inner ear is made up of the hearing portion (cochlea) and the labyrinth, a system of fluid-filled tubes and sacs (the semicircular canals, utricle, and saccule). Vestibular nerves connect the labyrinth to the brain. The vestibular labyrinth helps maintain an individual's balance by monitoring head and body movements in conjunction with vision and joint proprioception (somatosensory input). When the labyrinth or vestibular nerve is inflamed or dysfunctional, it sends signals to the brain indicating that movement is occurring; when visual and joint proprioceptive input disagree, the conflicting input causes a feeling of vertigo. Vestibular neuronitis normally affects only one ear, and is not usually accompanied by ringing in the ear (tinnitus) or deafness.

The cause of vestibular neuronitis is unclear, although it may result from a viral infection entering the inner ear from the lining of the brain (meninges), middle ear, or bloodstream. Some of the more common viruses associated with vestibular neuronitis include influenza, measles (rubeola), mumps, German measles (rubella), herpes, hepatitis, polio, and Epstein-Barr virus. Vestibular neuronitis is relatively common given the number of viruses that can cause it.

Vestibular neuronitis may also be caused by the movement of dislodged calcium carbonate crystals (otoconia) on the hair cells of the semicircular canals, which can cause abnormal stimulation of the vestibular nerve and result in vertigo; this occurs more frequently in the elderly. Occasionally, a fall may precipitate a transient vertigo attack.

Since it is difficult to determine whether the vestibular nerve or labyrinth is the site of the infection, the terms "neuronitis" and "labyrinthitis" are used almost interchangeably. Vestibular neuronitis is often called viral labyrinthitis.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor