Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Vocational Therapy


Related Terms

  • Rehabilitative Employment

Specialists

  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Psychiatrist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Alcohol or substance abuse disorders
  • Cardiopulmonary disease
  • Obesity
  • Psychiatric disorders
  • Severe depression

Factors Influencing Duration

There is no disability associated with the vocational therapy itself. The only factors influencing the length of disability are dictated by the underlying condition that prompted therapy.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
93.85 - Vocational Therapy; Sheltered Employment; Vocational: Assessment, Retraining, Training

Overview

Vocational therapy is often used in combination with a structured rehabilitation program and is designed to enable the disabled individual to resume productive employment. Individuals who have experienced changes in their mental or physical function due to illness or injury may require vocational therapy to allow them to return to work. Vocational therapy works with individuals and their new physical or mental status to find an appropriate occupational match.

Vocational therapy involves an assessment phase where the individual's skills and aptitudes are evaluated through tests, which is an integral part of vocational therapy. These tests may take several forms and are used to assess an individual's general intelligence level, his of her aptitudes, interests, and work skills. For example, an individual's performance in a series of standardized tests may be compared to a list of essential aptitudes that are grouped by occupations and listed in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles. If a match is obtained and the individual is willing, a job search may be initiated. Another method often used to assess an individual's vocational needs may be a work sample measure. This test measures characteristics such as eye, hand, and foot coordination, dexterity, and size discrimination abilities.

Following completion of the assessment phase, a list of goals is developed and the requirements of specific jobs are assessed. Finally, a determination is made as to whether the individual has the aptitude and skill necessary for a particular job of interest or whether additional training is required. Should additional training be required, the vocational therapist helps determine the types of training necessary.

Vocational training may involve business or vocational instruction, college or university education, and on-the-job training. If the individual qualifies, as in the case of veterans, state and / or federal funds may be used to pay for this training. Additionally, many employers participate in programs that use both state and private funds to cover the wages of the individual in training.

Vocational therapy may also involve re-training. Re-training in computers for example, may be essential for success in today's job market. As such, individuals who have lost jobs as a result of company downsizing, industry elimination, or whose skills are now obsolete are candidates for vocational therapy. Finally, structured workshops are also common methods of training individual with severe disabilities. These workshops focus on topics such as money management, communication skills, and appropriate business attire.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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